Award for AIP scientist Else Starkenburg

28. November 2016. On 26 November 2016, Else Starkenburg from the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP) was honoured with the physics award of the Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities. She received the award for her work on galactic archaeology and her substantial contributions to disentangle the history of our Milky Way. At the award ceremony, Else Starkenburg gave a talk on the topic of “The galactic archaeology of the Milky Way”, showing how to reconstruct the galaxies history by observing stars of different age.
Award for AIP scientist Else Starkenburg

Michael Kunze, president of the academy Andreas Gardt, Else Starkenburg und minister Stefan Wenzel. Picture: Adrienne Lochte.

Grown up in the Neterlands, Else Starkenburg completed her Ph.D. in 2011 at the Kapteyn Astronomical Institute of the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. She also holds an M.Sc. in Physics and Astronomy and an M.A. in Theoretical Philosophy. After working at the University of Victoria, Canada, Else Starkenburg came to AIP as the Karl Schwarzschild Fellow 2014. She is mainly interested in studying the history of the Milky Way and the smaller galaxies surrounding it. Since 2015, she also heads the Emmy Noehter Research Group „The early Milky Way“ at AIP.

Every year, the Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities awards a price for outstanding scientific achievements in the fields of biology, chemistry and physics published in international magazines. Publishing houses, industrial companies and foundations fund the prices.

 

Science contact: Dr. Else Starkenburg, +49 331-7499 350, estarkenburg@aip.de
Media contact: Kerstin Mork, +49 331-7499 803, presse@aip.de

The key areas of research at the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP) are cosmic magnetic fields and extragalactic astrophysics. A considerable part of the institute's efforts aim at the development of research technology in the fields of spectroscopy, robotic telescopes, and e-science. The AIP is the successor of the Berlin Observatory founded in 1700 and of the Astrophysical Observatory of Potsdam founded in 1874. The latter was the world's first observatory to emphasize explicitly the research area of astrophysics. The AIP has been a member of the Leibniz Association since 1992.