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Aquila

 


The Aquila Comparison Project

 

Goals
The Aquila project compares results from a set of simulations of a Milky Way-sized galaxy performed using nine different gasdynamical codes. The simulations all share common initial conditions and were analysed in the same way as far as possible.
The main aims of the project were:
  • To investigate how galaxy properties change when particular physics is included and different modelling techniques are employed.
  • To assess how closely the simulations can reproduce observational data from the Milky Way and the local Universe.
  • To highlight the modelling techniques and physical mechanisms that promote the formation of a realistic stellar disk.

 

People
Cecilia Scannapieco / Markus Wadepuhl / Owen Parry / Julio Navarro / Adrian Jenkins / Volker Springel / Romain Teyssier / Eric Carlson / Hugh Couchman / Rob Crain / Claudio Dalla Vecchia / Carlos Frenk /
Chiaki Kobayashi / Pierluigi Monaco / Giuseppe Murante / Takashi Okamoto / Tom Quinn / Joop Schaye /
Greg Stinson / Tom Theuns / James Wadsley / Simon White / Rory Woods

 

Initial Conditions
If you are interested in using our initial conditions to test your own simulation code, you can find them here:
SPH codes
Grid codes

 

Full resolution figures of Aquila paper
Fig.1 / Fig.2 / Fig.5 / Fig.9a / Fig.9b / Fig.12

 

Distribution of gas and stars

These plots show the present-day distributions of gas and stars within the galactic radius (1/10th of Rvir) for various runs.

(Face-on and edge-on views are defined always with respect to the orientation of the stellar disk of each model.)

The last column shows the distribution of circularities (see paper) which allows to quantify the relative importance of the bulge and disk components.

 

Stellar distributions as a function of redshift
These plots show the spatial distribution of stars within the galactic radius as a function of redshift for various runs (in an edge-on view).

 

Gas distributions as a function of redshift
These plots show the spatial distribution of gas within the galactic radius as a function of redshift for various runs (in an edge-on view).

 

Misaligned disks in the G3-TO simulation
In the G3-TO simulation, a substantial fraction of the stellar bulge is built through the collapse of a gravitationally unstable disk configuration. The misalignment is induced by a minor merger at z~3 which drags the existing gaseous and stellar disks into the orbital plane of the incoming satellite. A new disk then forms along the initial orientation with the angular momentum of gas cooling out of the halo. The figures show the distribution of gas (left) and stars (right).

 

Movie: The evolution of mass density and temperature in G3-BH

Download movie

The movie shows  the projected DM density in the upper left panel,  the projected gas density in the upper right panel and  the projected stellar density in the lower left panel. The lower right panel shows the mass-weighted projected temperature. All projections are done within a cube centered on our halo.

 

Gas distribution wihtin the virial radius
These plots show the evolution with redshift of the gas distribution in various runs (in a face-on view).

 

Contact: Cecilia Scannapieco