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Reproducing the large-scale Universe
by Kerstin Mork published Feb 16, 2016 last modified Feb 19, 2016 11:10 AM — filed under: , ,
16 February 2016. The BOSS survey has scanned the sky measuring the redshifts of more than 1 million galaxies, yielding a three dimensional picture of luminous sources in our Universe covering about 4.5 billion years. An international team of astronomers has now reproduced the observed galaxy clustering and determined the uncertainties in the measurement of observed quantities by generating thousands of simulated galaxy catalogues. For the first time, the separation between pairs of galaxies, and the separation between triplets of galaxies has been explicitly constrained to reproduce the observations. Hence, the cosmic web in particular the empty regions between galaxies are described.
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The Missing Brown Dwarfs
by Kerstin Mork published Apr 08, 2016 last modified Jul 14, 2016 01:41 PM — filed under: , ,
8 April 2016. When re-analysing catalogued and updated observational data of brown dwarfs in the solar neighbourhood, astronomers from Potsdam have found that a significant number of nearby brown dwarfs should still be out there, awaiting their discovery. The corresponding study by Gabriel Bihain and Ralf-Dieter Scholz from the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP) challenges the previously established picture of brown dwarfs in the solar neighbourhood.
Located in News / Press Releases
Cosmic Beacons Reveal the Milky Way's Ancient Core
by Kerstin Mork published Apr 22, 2016 last modified Jul 14, 2016 01:43 PM — filed under: , ,
22 April 2016. An international team of astronomers led by Dr. Andrea Kunder of the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP) in Germany and Dr. R. Michael Rich of UCLA has discovered that the central 2000 light years within the Milky Way Galaxy hosts an ancient population of stars. These stars are more than 10 billion years old and their orbits in space preserve the early history of the formation of the Milky Way.
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Other Suns got the right spin
by Kerstin Mork published May 17, 2016 last modified Jul 14, 2016 01:42 PM — filed under: , ,
17 May 2016. Astrophysicists from the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP) and the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore have for the first time measured the rotation periods of stars in a cluster nearly as old as the Sun and found them to be similar. It turns out that these stars spin around once in about twenty-six days – just like our Sun. This discovery significantly strengthens what is known as the solar-stellar connection, a fundamental principle that guides much of modern solar and stellar astrophysics.
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Where are all the dwarfs?
by Gabriele Schoenherr published Feb 01, 2013 last modified Jun 13, 2014 11:26 AM — filed under: ,
1 February 2013. Astronomers of the international CLUES collaboration have identified “Cosmic Web Stripping” as a new way of explaining the famous missing dwarf problem: the lack of observed dwarf galaxies compared with that predicted by the theory of Cold Dark Matter and Dark Energy.
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Neptune closer than ever: Super Sharp Pictures form the Edge of our Solar System
by Franziska Gräfe published Jul 18, 2018 last modified Mar 01, 2019 01:05 PM — filed under: , , ,
18 July 2018. Astronomers from the Leibniz-Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP) tested as part of an international team a new observation mode with the MUSE instrument at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile in June 2018. The technology used for the first time suppresses the blurred effects of the atmosphere even better and produces very sharp images of planets, stars and galaxies – among others of Neptune, which was once discovered at the predecessor institute of the AIP.
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Journey to the Beginning of Time
by Franziska Gräfe published Oct 08, 2018 last modified Mar 01, 2019 01:04 PM — filed under: , ,
8 October 2018. With the Pristine survey, an international team is looking for and researching the oldest stars in our Universe. The goal is to learn more about the young Universe right after the Big Bang. In a recent publication, the scientists have reported on the discovery of a particularly metal-poor star: a messenger from the distant past.
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Energetic electrons produced by shocks on the Sun
by Franziska Gräfe published Feb 22, 2019 last modified Mar 01, 2019 04:29 PM — filed under: ,
22 February 2019. Our Sun is an active star. Its activity manifests not only in the well-known 11-year Sun spot cycle but also in terms of short lived eruptions in its outer, hot atmosphere: the corona.
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Nearby galaxy shows how the young, dark Universe became illuminated
by Sarah Hönig published Mar 25, 2019 last modified Jul 17, 2019 11:43 AM — filed under: , ,
25 March 2019. A team of astronomers found a nearby star-forming galaxy to emit energetic photons in a similar way to the first generation of galaxies. These first galaxies turned the Universe transparent, less than one billion years after the Big Bang.
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Nova rediscovered after more than 2,000 years
by Sarah Hönig published Apr 29, 2019 last modified Apr 30, 2019 03:27 PM — filed under: , ,
29 April 2019. Modern astronomical observations now discovered the remnant of a nova explosion whose position corresponds to a celestial phenomenon described in ancient Chinese records. The discovery thus confirms one of the oldest astronomical observations outside the solar system.
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