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MUSE most detailed look at galaxy field
by Katrin Albaum published Nov 29, 2017 last modified Nov 29, 2017 01:22 PM — filed under: , ,
29 November 2017. Astronomers using the MUSE instrument on ESO’s Very Large Telescope in Chile focused on the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, measuring distances and properties of 1600 very faint galaxies including 72 galaxies that have never been detected before. This resulted in the deepest spectroscopic observations ever made and 10 science papers that are being published in a special issue of Astronomy & Astrophysics.
Located in News / Scientific Highlights
The dark side of light
by Kerstin Mork published Feb 12, 2015 last modified Apr 02, 2015 11:13 AM — filed under: , ,
12 February 2015. In the highly interdisciplinary research project "Loss of the Night", scientists of very different institutions of the Leibniz Association investigate the increasing illumination of the night, its ecological, cultural and socioeconomic effects, and the effects on human health. Their aim is to develop improved lighting concepts and sustainable technologies.
Located in News / Institute News
ESO: Looking Deeply into the Universe in 3D
by Kerstin Mork published Feb 26, 2015 last modified Apr 02, 2015 11:09 AM — filed under: , ,
26 February 2015. MUSE goes beyond Hubble
Located in News / Scientific Highlights
Solar eclipse seen by the LOFAR RadioTelescope
by Kerstin Mork published Mar 23, 2015 last modified Apr 02, 2015 11:06 AM — filed under: , ,
23 March 2015. The European radio interferometer LOFAR succeeded in taking unique pictures of the solar eclipse on March 20th as it is not possible by eye.
Located in News / Institute News
First Light for PEPSI
by Kerstin Mork published Apr 22, 2015 last modified Jul 02, 2015 08:51 AM — filed under: , , ,
22 April 2015. The Potsdam Echelle Polarimetric and Spectroscopic Instrument (PEPSI) has received its first celestial light through the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). Astronomers from the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam showed the instruments incredible capabilities at different wavelengths and resolving powers. Among the first targets were several of the bright Gaia-ESO benchmark stars, magnetically active stars, solar-like stars with planets, a solar twin in M67, Jupiter’s four Galilean moons, and the bright Nova Sgr 2015b.
Located in News / Institute News
To flare or not to flare: The riddle of galactic thin–thick disk solved
by Kerstin Mork published Apr 24, 2015 last modified Mar 29, 2016 03:59 PM — filed under: , ,
24 April 2015. A long-standing puzzle regarding the nature of disk galaxies has finally been solved by a team of astronomers led by Ivan Minchev from the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP), using state-of-the-art theoretical models. The new study shows that groups of stars with the same age always flare as the result of massive galactic collisions. When taken all together, these flares, nested like the petals of a blooming rose, puff up the disk and constitute what astronomers call the “thick” disk.
Located in News / Press Releases
Largest catalogue of X-ray detected astrophysical objects published
by Kerstin Mork published Apr 28, 2015 last modified Oct 20, 2015 03:36 PM — filed under: , ,
28 April 2015. A systematic analysis of all observations performed so far by the X-ray satellite XMM-Newton resulted in the worlds most comprehensive catalogue of X-ray detected celestial objects. It was compiled and published by a science consortium, the XMM-Newton Survey Science Centre, the AIP being one of its members. The catalogue, called 3XMM-DR5, lists 565 962 X-ray detections, ranging from nearby objects in our Solar System to supermassive black holes at the edge of the Universe. For each detection, a wealth of information is provided to help understand the nature of the object and as a result, many new and extreme astrophysical objects will be discovered.
Located in News / Scientific Highlights
Digitizing astronomical photographic plates
by Kerstin Mork published May 05, 2015 last modified Oct 20, 2015 03:35 PM — filed under: , ,
5 May 2015. The Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP), in collaboration with Hamburger Sternwarte and Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte Bamberg, is digitizing an archive of astronomical photographic plates as a means to preserve cultural heritage. These photographic plates contain observations spanning nearly 100 years. They provide precious longterm information which can be mined by modern data extraction techniques. The project is supported by a DFG grant (German Research Funding Organisation).
Located in News / Scientific Highlights
CCI meets in Potsdam
by Kerstin Mork published May 22, 2015 last modified May 22, 2015 01:35 PM — filed under: ,
22. May 2015. The International Scientific Committee (known internationally by its initials in Spanish) "CCI" held its 73rd meeting at the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP), Potsdam, Germany in May 2015. The meeting was sponsored and held on behalf of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft DFG.
Located in News / Institute News
13 June: Long Night of Sciences
by Kerstin Mork published Jun 10, 2015 last modified Jul 08, 2015 08:17 AM — filed under: ,
The Long Night of Sciences took place on Saturday, 13 June in Berlin and on the Telegrafenberg in Potsdam. The Einstein Tower and Great Refractor welcomed many curious visitors.
Located in News / Institute News