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Historical Sky: Half a century of Potsdam solar research digitally accessible
by Franziska Gräfe published Sep 23, 2020 — filed under: , ,
23 September 2020. As part of the large-scale digitization project APPLAUSE, digitized photographic plates have recently become available online, with images of the sun taken between 1943 and 1991 at the Einstein Tower Solar Observatory in Potsdam.
Located in News / Scientific Highlights
Cosmic dance: A solution to the Galactic bar paradox
by Franziska Gräfe published Aug 25, 2020 last modified Sep 22, 2020 11:42 AM — filed under: , ,
25 August 2020. The very heart of our Milky Way harbours a large bar-like structure of stars whose size and rotational speed have been strongly contested in the last years. A new study has found an elegant solution to the discrepancies found in different observational studies, using the fact that the bar and spiral arms move at different rotational velocities, encountering each other about every 80 Million years. As the faster-rotating bar approaches a spiral arm, it appears to be much longer and their ongoing mutual attraction due to gravity periodically varies both their rotational speeds.
Located in News / Scientific Highlights
Mysterious dimming of Betelgeuse: Dust clearing up
by Franziska Gräfe published Aug 13, 2020 last modified Sep 08, 2020 10:10 PM — filed under: , ,
13 August 2020. Between October 2019 and February 2020 the brightness of the star Betelgeuse has dropped by more than a factor of three. New observations by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and the robotic STELLA telescope of the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP) now provide an explanation for the phenomenon.
Located in News / Scientific Highlights
The ultimate RAVE: final data release published
by Kristin Riebe published Jul 27, 2020 last modified Sep 08, 2020 10:10 PM — filed under: , ,
27 July 2020. How do the stars in our Milky Way move? For more than a decade RAVE, one of the first and largest systematic spectroscopic surveys, studied the motion of Milky Way stars. The RAVE collaboration now published the results for over half a million observations in its 6th and final data release. RAVE succeeded in measuring the velocities, temperatures, compositions and distances for different types of stars. The unique database enables scientists to systematically disentangle the structure and evolution history of our Galaxy.
Located in News / Scientific Highlights
First images of the Sun from Solar Orbiter
by Franziska Gräfe published Jul 16, 2020 last modified Jul 16, 2020 02:25 PM — filed under: , ,
16 July 2020. Solar Orbiter, a mission of the space agencies ESA and NASA, publishes for the first time images that show our home star as close as never before. Prior to this, the test phase of all instruments was successfully completed.
Located in News / Scientific Highlights
Joseph Whittingham receives study prize for physics
by Franziska Gräfe published Jul 09, 2020 — filed under: , ,
9 July 2020. The Physikalische Gesellschaft zu Berlin (PGzB) awards the student for his master thesis, which he completed in the Department of Cosmology and High Energy Astrophysics at the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP).
Located in News / Institute News
The X-ray sky in its full glory
by Sarah Hönig published Jun 19, 2020 last modified Jun 20, 2020 04:30 AM — filed under: , ,
19 June 2020. The eROSITA space telescope has provided a new, sharp 360° view of the hot and energetic processes across the Universe. The new map contains more than one million objects, roughly doubling the number of known X-ray sources discovered over the 60-year history of X-ray astronomy. Scientists at the Leibniz Institute of Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP) have contributed with the discovery of a circular structure caused by a black hole outburst 10,000 years ago.
Located in News / Scientific Highlights
Four newborn exoplanets get cooked by their sun
by Sarah Hönig published Jun 11, 2020 — filed under: , ,
11 June 2020. Scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP) examined the fate of the young star V1298 Tau and its four orbiting exoplanets. The results show that these recently born planets are roasted by the intense X-ray radiation of their young sun, which leads to the vaporisation of the gaseous envelope of these planets. The innermost planets could be evaporated down to their rocky cores, so that there is no atmosphere left.
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AIP Schwarzschild Fellow Marcel Pawlowski receives Klaus Tschira Boost Fund
by Sarah Hönig published May 11, 2020 last modified May 12, 2020 10:39 AM — filed under: , ,
11 May 2020. Dr. Marcel Pawlowski, Schwarzschild Fellow at the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP), receives funding from the Klaus Tschira Foundation and the German Scholars Organisation for his research on the distribution of satellite galaxies around the Milky Way and the nature of dark matter.
Located in News / Institute News
Science donates equipment to health care facilities
by Sarah Hönig published Apr 01, 2020 last modified Apr 01, 2020 01:49 PM — filed under: , ,
1 April 2020. The Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP) provides protective equipment to fight the corona epidemic. The Minister of Science and Culture Manja Schüle hands over the utensils, which were collected at Brandenburg universities and non-university research institutions, to the mayor of Potsdam, Mike Schubert.
Located in News / Institute News