Virtual Babelsberg Starry Night

Unbenannt.png

Artist's impression of a black hole.

Credit: XMM-Newton/ESA/NASA
Nov. 17, 2021 //

The next lecture of the virtual Babelsberg Starry Nights of the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP) on the topic "Black holes in the universe" will be broadcasted starting on Thursday, 18 November 2021 on the YouTube channel "Urknall, Weltall und das Leben". Please note that the lecture will be given in German.

On Thursday, starting at 6 p.m., Professor Christoph Pfrommer's lecture on the topic "Black holes in the universe" from the Babelsberg Starry Night series will be online.

Black holes are among the most mysterious objects in our universe. But what do we really know about them and what is science fiction? In this lecture, we will embark on a journey to the limits of our knowledge and learn what makes black holes so fascinating. Christoph Pfrommer will explain the observations that finally convinced astrophysicists that black holes exist in reality and that were recently honoured with two Nobel Prizes. In addition, the scientist will present theories that explain the formation and growth of cosmic objects. But black holes are not isolated in the universe, they can even influence the evolution of galaxies and galaxy clusters. By studying black holes, we better understand the mysteries of cosmological structure formation.

This season, the Babelsberg Starry Nights will not take place on site at the AIP, but will come straight to your home: on the 3rd Thursday of each month from 6 p.m. The lectures are available at

https://www.aip.de/babelsberger-sternennaechte

or via the YouTube channel Urknall, Weltall und das Leben (Big bang, the Universe and Life) and can be viewed at any time afterwards.

Further information

Talk on Youtube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3K9ovJ78hps

Unbenannt.png

Artist's impression of a black hole.

Credit: XMM-Newton/ESA/NASA
Nov. 17, 2021 //

The next lecture of the virtual Babelsberg Starry Nights of the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP) on the topic "Black holes in the universe" will be broadcasted starting on Thursday, 18 November 2021 on the YouTube channel "Urknall, Weltall und das Leben". Please note that the lecture will be given in German.

On Thursday, starting at 6 p.m., Professor Christoph Pfrommer's lecture on the topic "Black holes in the universe" from the Babelsberg Starry Night series will be online.

Black holes are among the most mysterious objects in our universe. But what do we really know about them and what is science fiction? In this lecture, we will embark on a journey to the limits of our knowledge and learn what makes black holes so fascinating. Christoph Pfrommer will explain the observations that finally convinced astrophysicists that black holes exist in reality and that were recently honoured with two Nobel Prizes. In addition, the scientist will present theories that explain the formation and growth of cosmic objects. But black holes are not isolated in the universe, they can even influence the evolution of galaxies and galaxy clusters. By studying black holes, we better understand the mysteries of cosmological structure formation.

This season, the Babelsberg Starry Nights will not take place on site at the AIP, but will come straight to your home: on the 3rd Thursday of each month from 6 p.m. The lectures are available at

https://www.aip.de/babelsberger-sternennaechte

or via the YouTube channel Urknall, Weltall und das Leben (Big bang, the Universe and Life) and can be viewed at any time afterwards.

Further information

Talk on Youtube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3K9ovJ78hps

The key areas of research at the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP) are cosmic magnetic fields and extragalactic astrophysics. A considerable part of the institute's efforts aims at the development of research technology in the fields of spectroscopy, robotic telescopes, and E-science. The AIP is the successor of the Berlin Observatory founded in 1700 and of the Astrophysical Observatory of Potsdam founded in 1874. The latter was the world's first observatory to emphasize explicitly the research area of astrophysics. The AIP has been a member of the Leibniz Association since 1992.
Last update: 19. November 2021